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Japanese Manga/Anime, Chinese Kung-fu, Hong Kong Movies and Other Miscellaneous Topics:
A Dialogue with Italian Friend Daniele Chetta

Nov. 15, 2003



[Introduction]

Manabu:
I'm Manabu Tsuribe, the webmaster of this site. Today I would like to talk with Daniele Chetta, a friend of mine from Italy. We got to know each other for the first time when he signed the guestbook at this site. Since then, sometimes we exchange information via e-mail, but we have never met off-line, so I would like to take this opportunity to ask him various questions.


[About Ourselves]

Manabu:
Ciao Daniele. First of all, let's talk about each other's personal histories.
I was born in Tokyo, Japan in 1968. I still live in Tokyo. After graduating from university, I have worked as a software engineer at a system development company. My major in the university was modern Western history. My hobbies are reading books (including manga=Japanese graphic novels), listening to music, and watching movies (including anime=Japanese animations). When I was a school boy, I liked playing basketball and swimming, but these days I don't play any sports (just watching).
I heard that you are a university student, and you like Japanese manga and anime, especially Go Nagai's works... Please feel free to talk about yourself.

Daniele:
Hi Manabu. I'm glad to talk about each other, and glad you have a sort of interview with me.
My name is Daniele Chetta. I was born in Naples on March 3rd, 1981. Now I'm living in San Giorgio a Cremano near Naples (only few kilometers away), one of the provinces at the bottom of the sleeping volcano: "Vesuvio".
My nick is Godnagai: "GO"-d-"NAGAI".

Manabu:
You mean that the Japanese manga artist Go Nagai is something like God for you, don't you? I'd like to talk about Go Nagai later.

Daniele:
After graduating at the high school, I got into a university. My major is international management. Now I'm studying. Maybe after graduating from university I'll travel a lot. Maybe I could see Japan too, because I love Japan! And I can meet you, dear Manabu!

Manabu:
What do you do if you could come to Japan? Where do you go? I'll guide you to the places you'd like to go.

Daniele:
I'd like to see various people, such as girls. I love Japanese girls. I'd also like to see some places I have seen in manga. I'd like to see Fuji Mountain, Tokyo Tower, Shinjuku (I have heard about it a lot of times) I'd like to travel around famous places in Japan with my friend and guide, Manabu. I'd like to walk in the streets to feel like a real Japanese. Maybe I would do various things, but I should have a lot of time.

Manabu:
Shinkuju is one of the central cities in Tokyo and a big amusement area. Every weekday morning, when I go to my office, I change trains at Shinjuku Station. You know, the rush hour in Tokyo is terrible, especially near Shinjuku. Every morning we are crammed into overcrowded trains and nearly crushed to death! It's really murderous.
If I have a time, I would like to take you to Kyoto, the ancient capital city in the western Japan. Kyoto is a famous tourist spot, where you can see lots of Japanese historical buildings and gardens.
I want to take you to Akihabara (we call it 'Akiba' for short) too, the electric town in Tokyo. Because there are lots of stores selling anime-related stuff: DVD, music CD, book, toy, model, video game and so on (please note that Japanese videos (VHS/DVD) cannot be viewed on European TV, because they are NTSC-formatted, and Japanese DVDs are mostly region 2 encoded).
I also hope to take a sightseeing trip to Italy sometime in the future. Maybe it will be a short stay in summer vacation.

Daniele:
What would you like to do first if you could come in Italy?

Manabu:
Well, I'd like to see Vesuvio volcano and Pompeii Ruins in Naples. And then, Colosseo (Colosseum) in Rome too.

Daniele:
I'll offer you hospitality in my home in Italy. You can see volcano Vesuvio too, because it is not far from my home. See this picture. A photo of Vesuvio I took from my room's window:

Vesuvio volcano

Manabu:
It's so close to your home, isn't it? I'm glad if I could stay at your home.
What kind of work would you like to do after graduating university?

Daniele:
I'd like to be a manager. I'd like to have relationship of commerce or something else with Japanese.


[About Hobbies]

Bronson and Tetsuo Hara/Hokuto no Ken
Bronson and Tetsuo Hara/Hokuto no Ken

Daniele:
My hobby is reading comics. I read American Comics too, but my favorite is Japanese Manga.
The first manga I read was "Ken il Guerriero" (the original Japanese title is "Hokuto no Ken", and the English title is "Fist of the North Star"), that was in 1991. After that, I read "Ushio and Tora", "Dragonball", "Ranma 1/2", "Guyver", all Mitsuru Adachi and Masakazu Katsura's stories, but my most favorite is GO NAGAI's works. I love all his masterpieces, not only manga, but also anime (like "Mazinger" series, "Grendizer", "Getter" Saga, the new "Mazinkaiser" and so on). Sadly, not every his work is translated into Italian... (sigh)
My interest in Japan is first born thanks to anime imported in the 1980's and 90's and then thanks to manga. So growing up, my desire to know about Japan is increasing.

Manabu:
Here, let me explain the background for the sake of readers who wouldn't know that. In Europe, espacially in France, Spain and Italy, enormous amount of Japanese animations had been aired on TV from the late 1970s to the early 1980s. "Mazinger Z", "Great Mazinger", "Getter Robo" and "UFO Robo Grendizer" also had already been aired in Europe in the late 1970s. These are all TV anime series based on the original conceptions by Go Nagai and his Dynamic Productions, and the classics of the "Giant Robot" anime genre. Among others, "UFO Robo Grendizer" (the French title was "Goldorak", and the Italian title was "Goldrake") was a big hit, so there are lots of Go Nagai fans in Europe.
I also watched Go Nagai's Giant Robot animes on TV when I was a little boy. My most favorite was "Great Mazinger". It was clearly much cooler than "Mazinger Z". I like it even now.
What are your other hobbies besides reading comics?

Daniele:
Modeling. I'm collecting resin kits of Go Nagai's robots and others. They are all made in Japan.

Manabu:
I was also absorbed in modeling anime robots for a while. I liked the plastic models of mobile suits from the "Gundam" series.

Daniele:
The first model I built was a mobile suit.
And, I like miniaturing too. I paint "Warhammer Fantasy" and "Warhammer 40.000" miniatures. Do you know about "Warhammer"?

Manabu:
A war game with miniature armies, isn't it? There are some "Warhammer" players in Japan too.

Daniele:
I spend a lot of time (mainly at night) to see anime. And often, when it's impossible to wait the Italian version, I buy or change the original Japanese materials with other fans or my friends.
I'd like to listen the Japanese dubbers. They use heart in dubbing, like Italian dubbers do. "Screw Crusher Punch!".... "Koshiryoku Beam!"... "Getter Wiiinngg!"... Ah, it's fantastic!

Manabu:
You used several "technical terms", so let me explain: "Screw Crusher Punch" is a shout when Grendizer uses the weapon, and "Koshiryoku Beam" is the beams from Mazinger Z's eyes, and "Getter Wing" is Getter Robot's wings for flying, isn't it? ...Those have nostalgic sounds to me, because I watched those Super Robot animes on TV for the first time when I was about four or five years old.
Do you like listening to music?

Daniele:
I like listen to music of all kind.
One of my dream in Japan is enter in one of the places with karaoke and sing an anime song in Japanese with all my voice: "Dash! Dash! DanDanDaDaan! Dash! Dash! DanDanDaDaan! Sukulamburu Dash!" ...This is the song of "Greater Mazinger" :-p

Manabu:
"Sukulamburu Dash" is a Japanese-style pronunciation of "scramble dash", isn't it? When you come to Japan, I'll take you to a karaoke bar. Let's sing songs together there. There are lots of anime songs in Japanese karaoke menu.


[About Sports]

Manabu:
By the way, you are a Chinese martial arts (kung-fu) master, aren't you?

Daniele:
I spend a lot of my time at a "Kung-Fu Wu-Shu Martial Arts School" called "Teng Long" in Chinese. There my friends call me as "Daniel-San".
I love kung-fu and I practice it hard and seriously as a competitive sport. I also have stayed in China for studying Wu-Shu (the Chinese word for martial arts) at the physical education institute of the University of Zhengzhou.

Manabu:
Are you a black belt holder in kung-fu?

Daniele:
I'm a black belt but My Sifu (the Chinese word for instructor) told me: "Remember the belt supports the trousers, you can pick up the color you want!" (laughter)

Manabu:
I heard that you won the National Kung-Fu Competition in Italy twice. Is it true?

Daniele:
Yes, it's true. This year I won two golds in traditional style of the praying mantis (called "Tang Lang" in Chinese): a free competition with nude hands and one with the spear.

Manabu:
That's great... Do you play soccer? Italy is one of the strongest nations in soccer, isn't it?

Daniele:
I don't like to play soccer so much. Sometimes I played it with my friends when I was a child.

Manabu:
Do you watch the matches of the Italian soccer league Serie A?

Daniele:
No, I never watch them. I like to watch with my friend only the matches of Italy's national team. I'm not an expert in soccer. It's strange for an Italian, isn't it?

Manabu:
Recently some Japanese soccer players have played in Serie A, so the league games are aired on Japanese TV too. I'm not a soccer freak, but I also watch the matches of Japan's national team on TV.
By the way, I think we tend to be patriotic/nationalistic for some reason when we watch international soccer matches. So do I, at some level, though I am normally a leftist and I hate nationalism... Do you have something like your political position or belief?

Daniele:
When I watch an international matches of Italy, I'm patriotic/nationalistic too. I'm proud to be an Italian. But I'm not so hard nationalistic. In fact, I have some free ideas about that matter. I don't have any political position now, maybe because I'm too young and I think with my head... but I'm inclined on the left.

Manabu:
Do you believe in a religion?

Daniele:
Yes, I believe in religion. I believe in God. But I don't actively practice any religion.


[About Films]

Manabu:
Do you like Hong Kong's action films?

Daniele:
I love Jackie Chan and Jet Li films. You also love Jackie Chan's films, we have a lot of things in common, don't you think so?

Jackie Chan/Police Story
Jackie Chan/Police Story

Manabu:
Well, in Europe and the US, there are lots of people who like both Hong Kong's action films and Japanese animations, I think. For example, Andy and Larry Wachowski's film "The Matrix" has been influenced by those two elements.
Hong Kong's action films are popular in Japan too, of course. I enjoyed seeing Bruce Lee's "The Way of the Dragon" and "Enter the Dragon", and Jackie Chan's "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow", "Project A", "Police Story" and so on. I like Jackie Chan's humorous character and dangerous stunt action like Buster Keaton.
Speaking of "The Way of the Dragon", it was set in Italy, and on-location filming in Rome, wasn't it? The last scene in which Bruce Lee fought against Chuck Norris at the Colosseo was quite impressive.
What are your favorite films by Jackie Chan?

Daniele:
I love all his films, but I like "Drunken Master II", "Police Story I & II", "Rumble in the Bronx", "Who am I?", "Rush Hour I & II" and "Thunderbolt" in particular. In Italy some of them are unpublished, so I have bought them in China.

Manabu:
What kind of live-action films do you like, except Jackie Chan's films?

Daniele:
"The Matrix" is one of my favorite films. I like recent American films featuring super heroes: "Spiderman", "X-men", "Daredevil", "Hulk" and so on. I like the old trilogy of "Star Wars" too. I have bought on Dvd the 1st & 2nd episodes of the Saga (we are all waiting the 3rd Episode!). I like to go to the cinema with my friend. I have seen "Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring", "Lord of the Rings: The Twin Towers" (it's amazing, spectacular!). Have you read the book of Tolkien? it's fantastic!

Manabu:
I don't have read them yet, but Tolkien's books are popular in Japan too.
These days I seldom go to the movie theater. I watch movies on DVD. I like various types of films, including action/entertainment, but I liked mostly French Nouvelle Vague films and the like. As I told you before, in Italian films, I love Roberto Rossellini's "Voyage in Italy/Viaggio in Italia", Bernardo Bertolucci's "Before the Revolution/Prima della Rivoluzione" and so on.


[About Drinking and Eating]

Manabu:
What kind of foods do you like?

Daniele:
I love pizza. I eat always pasta. I'm a big eater.

Manabu:
I was also a big eater when I was younger, though I have a slender body. Now I try to eat lightly for losing weight. I prefer meat dishes and spicy foods like Indian and Korean ones. I usually eat both of Japanese foods (boiled rice, fishes and so on) and western dishes, like most of Japanese. Japanese foods are good for health.
Pasta was born in Naples, wasn't it? I do want to eat "real" pasta when I visit Italy.
Do you drink?

Daniele:
I don't like alcoholics, but sometimes I drink beer. I prefer Coca Cola.

Manabu:
You are not a "Drunken Master", aren't you? I also don't like to drink too much, though I had drunk heavily with my friends when I was in university. Actually, I prefer to eat sweet foods, like cake with tea, rather than to drink.
Do you drink tea or cappuccino?

Daniele:
I like cappuccino, But in Italy we drink capuccino only in the morning, and most people like to drink it in the bar, because the machine, that makes it, is better than household one. I prefer to have milk and chocolate in the morning or orange juice. I also like tea.

Manabu:
In Japan, cappuccino is known as a major coffee of Italy. We Japanese have mainly American coffee, tea and Japanese tea.


[About Running the Website and English]

Daniele:
By the way, how do you have had the idea of an interview with me?

Manabu:
Because our talk by exchanging e-mail was interesting, I decided to put our dialogue on the site, in this way, for people who may have interest in these topics. This dialogue is done in English, but I'll translate this into Japanese, because I think this is interesting to Japanese people who come to this site.
And, another reason is that I would like other people to participate in making this site. Because I run this site totally by myself, so sometimes I have a feeling that I want collaborators.

Daniele:
What is the reason of making a website? For pleasure? To meet friend?

Manabu:
I launched this site to exchange information and interact with people sharing the same interests and hobbies, like you. I myself always get much information from other web sites, so I thought I also would offer some information at my own site.
And, there are lots of anime-related web sites all over the world, but it seems there are not so many ones written in English by Japanese, so I would like to make a web site offering anime info from Japan to the world in English, as an anime fan living in Japan.
...Do Italian people all speak English, like you?

Daniele:
No. In Italy, some people speak poor English, and others speak no one word. Some boys of my age speak English better. I speak English well, but if I'll have more time I'd like to increase my ability. I think you are better than me, my friend!
How about it in Japan? Italian people think all Japanese speak English.

Manabu:
No, most of Japanese cannot speak English well, including me. We study English at school, but living in here in Japan, we have few chances to speak with non-Japanese people in English, so our English is not practical.


[About Japanese Manga]

Daniele:
What was the manga you read first?

Manabu:
When I was six years old, I read Fujio F. Fujiko's "Doraemon". It is a Sci-Fi comedy featuring Doraemon, a cat-like robot who came from the future world. Maybe that was the first manga I read. "Doraemon" is a very popular manga in Asian countries. The TV anime version was aired in Italy too.

Daniele:
Yeah, "Doraemon" is known in Italy. I think it is very popular here in Italy too. When I was young, I saw all the episodes of the TV series, but my most favorite anime of Fujio F. Fujiko was "Parman". The Italian title was "Superkid".

Manabu:
I read almost all the works by Fujio F. Fujiko ans his former collaborator Fujio Fujiko "A".
...Maybe what you saw on Italian TV was the old "Doraemon", aired in Japan in 1973. The new "Doraemon" TV series (started in 1979) has been continued even now.

Daniele:
What are your favorite manga works/authors?

Manabu:
My favorite manga works are, too many to list them all. To take some examples:

Osamu Tezuka/Phoenix, Black Jack, Adolf and lots more
Sanpei Shirato/The Legend of Kamui
Go Nagai/Devilman, Shuten Doji
Riyoko Ikeda/The Rose of Versailles (Lady Oscar)
Akimi Yoshida/Banana Fish
Hirohiko Araki/Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Ryoko Yamagishi/Hi izuru Tokoro no Tenshi (Heaven's Son in the Land of the Rising Sun), Arabesque
Hayao Miyazaki/Nausicaa of the Valley of Wind
Bronson and Tetsuo Hara/Hokuto no Ken (Fist of the North Star)
Yumiko Igarashi and Kyoko Mizuki/Candy Candy
Fujio F. Fujiko/Doraemon and lots more
Keiko Takemiya/Kaze to Ki no Uta (Song of Wind and Tree)
Moto Hagio/Poe no Ichizoku (The Poe Clan), The Heart of Thomas
Katsuhiro Otomo/Domu (A Child's Dream), Akira
Kazuo Umezu/Hyoryu Kyoshitsu (Drifting school), Senrei (Baptism), My Name is Shingo, and lots more
Hitoshi Iwaaki/Kiseiju (Parasyte)
Kentaro Miura/Berserk
Taiyo Matsumoto/Ping Pong
Asao Takamori and Tetsuya Chiba/Ashita no Joe (Tomorrow's Joe)
Akira Toriyama/Dr. Slump, Dragonball
Shotaro Ishinomori/Cyborg 009, Humanoid Kikaider
Takehiko Inoue/Slam Dunk
Minetaro Mochizuki/Dragon Head
Rumiko Takahashi/Urusei Yatsura, Maison Ikkoku
Yumiko Oshima/Wata no Kunihoshi
Suzue Miuchi/Garasu no Kamen (The Glass Mask)
Masami Yuuki/Patlabor The Mobile Police
Yoshihiro Togashi/Yu Yu Hakusho
Minoru Furuya/Inachu Ping Pong Club
Masamune Shirow/The Ghost in the Shell
Takayuki Yamaguchi/Kakugo no Susume (Apocalypse Zero)
...and so on.

I think there are some titles you know, because lots of Japanese manga have been translated into Italian.

Daniele:
I know many of these titles.

Manabu:
To tell you the truth, I prefer reading manga to watching anime. When I was a child, I was totally crazy about manga. I love reading manga even now.
You also like "Jojo's Bizarre Adventure", "Hokuto no Ken", "Akira", "Berserk", "Ashita no Joe", "Dragonball", "Kakugo no Susume", don't you?

Daniele:
I like "JoJo". Now I'm reading the "Jolyne Kujo" (the heroine of the "JoJo" Chapter 6) saga (but Jotaro is the best!). "Hokuto no ken" is a milestone of the Japan Cartoon aired on TV in Italy. There is no Italian who doesn't remember KEN!
In Italy, "Ashita no Joe" (the manga version) is now at the 10th volume published. And, about "Berserk", we are waiting the sequel, new stories.


[About Japanese Live-action Hero Films]

Daniele:
What do you think about the old live-action Japanese movie or TV series? I know "Godzilla", "Megaloman" and so on, but I think there were some older tv series in Japan than I know. In Italy, we have had only: "Megaloman", "Spectreman", "I-Zemborg", "X-Bomber", "Winspector", "Power Ranger" (that ugly American version!), and "Godzilla" movies.

Manabu:
The most famous "Tokusatsu" (live-action films with special photography/effects) hero series in Japan is "Ultraman" series. When I was a little child, I liked not only anime but also tokusatsu, such as "Ultraman", "Kamen Rider", "Kikaider" and so on. "Megaloman", which was aired on Japanese TV in 1979, was something like an epigone of "Ultraman" series, so in Japan it was not so popular as "Ultraman" series. "Megaloman" was more martial-arts-action oriented than "Ultraman".
Talking about "Godzilla", I liked the first movie (released in 1954). "Gamera" saga is good too.

Daniele:
When I was younger, I loved "Megaloman" very much. By the way I'm watching now the series because I have bought it from a fan who taped all the episodes on VHS from the TV some years ago and now I saved all on a VCD.

Manabu:
That is very precious, isn't it? In Japan "Ultraman" series is available on DVD, but "Megaloman" is not yet released on DVD. We can hardly watch "Megaloman", though it has been aired on cable TV this year (2003).

Daniele:
Do the children love these series even now in Japan?

Manabu:
Well, some series have been continued still now and popular among little boys. "Ultraman" series has been produced as TV series, movies and original videos since 1966, and it has been continued until now. "Ranger" series started with "Goranger" (some of them were aired in the US as "Power Ranger" series) also has been continued since 1975, and new series have been aired on TV every years.


[About Anime on TV Broadcasting and DVD]

Manabu:
As I said before, lots of Japanese anime series had been aired on Italian TV from the late 1970s to the early 1980s, but that was before you was born. How goes it after the late 1980s? Can you watch anime shows you want on Italian TV?

Daniele:
The Japanese old TV series had been aired on TV also during all the 1980s. They had been broadcasted again and again, because in Italy an episode is transmitted a day, not a week like in Japan. But in the 1990s, some of them were broadcasted again (for example "Hokuto no ken" is aired on TV about 2 or 3 times a year from the first broadcasting), and some of them were never trasmitted more (like "Gundam", "Mazinger Z", "Grendizer" and others), and some others new were introduced on TV in the last years (like "Pokemon", "Berserk", "Gundam Wing", "One Piece", "Beyblade", and others).
In Italy there are a lot of discussions between fans about distribution of anime, because in Italy all cartoons are targeted for children, so some of the best anime are released only on VHS or DVD, and we cannot see them on TV. The VHS and DVD are sold at prices right for the market and for the quality of the products, but the prices are very high for a boy who doesn't work. (One VHS costs nearly 20 euro and, a DVD 25 euro).
How are the prices of the anime VHS and DVD in Japan?

Manabu:
Basically, the commodity prices in Japan are very high. Even so, anime DVDs are too expensive. One DVD includes only 3 or 4 episodes and costs about 5000 or 6000 Yen (about 38 - 45 Euro). This price is much higher than live-action DVD's. Some people in Japan buy anime DVDs reimported from the US, because they are cheaper than original Japanese ones.
VHS is cheaper than DVD, but these days most of movies and animes are released only on DVD.
Here in Japan, enormous amount of animes have been released on DVD these years. How about anime release on DVD in Italy? In Italy, the DVD of "Lupin III" first TV series was released from Yamato Video in 2000, ahead of Japan (released in 2001 in Japan), wasn't it?

Daniele:
In Italy, the first titles have been released on DVD, and some titles are planned to be released from now.
All anime fans in Italy want anime to be provided to the real target audience. We are bored with hearing people say "anime and cartoons are for children". Through one great battle, some anime ("Golden Boy", "Slam Dunk", "Sayiuki", "GTO", "Inuyasha", "Evangelion", "Alexander" and others) were aired on TV at night (at 21:00 or 22:00). That was thanks to efforts of MTV Italia, Dynamic Italia and Yamato Video.
I have heard that in Japan anime shows are aired on TV at all hours for each target audience, and also at night adult anime are aired. Is it true?

Manabu:
On Japanese ground-wave TV, anime is only a part of all the programs, but there are several satellite broadcasting stations that air only anime programs (mainly reruns of old shows) 24 hours a day, everyday. Some anime shows are aired on ground-wave TV at midnight, but they are not adult anime. X-rated programs, including adult-oriented anime, cannot be aired on ground-wave TV. They are distributed on video (DVD), satellite broadcasting and broadband internet connection.
Anyway, Japanese anime works are too many to watch them all. Over 60 series have been aired on TV every months, and lots of films and videos also have been released. Of course there are lots of low-quality ones, so we always need to consider which is worth seeing.
...By the way, some Japanese animes include extremely violent scenes, such as "Hokuto no Ken". Can you watch the uncut version of violence anime shows like "Hokuto no Ken" on Italian TV? Or is it censored?

Daniele:
"Hokuto no Ken" was entirely broadcasted on TV, and there was no scene which was cut out. When I was a child, I saw the scenes in which Kenshiro touched the pressure points ("tsubo" in Japanese) of enemies, and I thought those scenes were censured, because we could see only the black silhouettes of the enemies blowing up (maybe that was to avoid showing the red blood), but after that I knew the scenes were so made and it was not a censorship.
The scenes that became a real problem in Italy in the past were not violence scenes, but some "sexy" scenes. For example, in "Dragonball", the scene in which Goku puts off the panties of Bulma when she was sleeping, and the scenes in which Bulma lifts up her skirt to get one of the Shenron spheres (dragonballs) from the Master Muten. The Italian TV station replaced those scenes by still pictures with dialogue going on. that was a horrible alteration for anime fans in Italy. In fact, we are always fighting a hard battle against censorship.


[In Closing]

Manabu:
Well, we have no end of topics to talk about, but I will end our talk this time. Lastly, please leave any messages to visitors or readers of this site.

Daniele:
This is the first time that I had an interview on the internet about myself and my hobbies. Thank you very much for all of you visitors of this website who have read this dialogue.
I want to say to all manga/anime creators in Japan, please keep going with your works, because we can't live without anime and manga!
And, to the people who think that "anime and cartoons are for children", I want to say, you can't judge a book by only the first page. You may lose great masterpieces because of preconceived ideas in your mind.
Special thanks to Go Nagai, because I was grown up with his works. I'd like to meet Mr. Nagai. I'd like to come in Japan, I'd like to live in Japan!
And finally, thank you Manabu, a very good friend. Bye-bye!

Manabu:
...I'm so happy that you love Japan, but maybe Japan is not so good place to live, I suppose.
Anyway, thank you very much for answering interview for a long time. I really enjoyed talking about various topics with you. I'll e-mail you again. See you later.




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